Monthly Archives: February 2016

Zoo Letterhead – Western U.S., 1956-1971

Letterhead-USWestZoos-005-RioGrandePark-redacted-CroppedContinuing our series on graphic design in letterhead, this installment features stationery from zoos and aquaria in the western United States during the mid 1950s – early 1970s.   (Letterhead from the late 19th and early 20th centuries is the subject of another post!)

Which is your favorite?  (You can right-click on the images to open them in new tabs and examine them more closely.)

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WCS NDSR Project Post: “Blurred Lines, Shapes, and Polygons,” parts 1 and 2

Genevieve Havemeyer-King, the National Digital Stewardship Resident here at the WCS Archives,  has recently published a two-part post at the Library of Congress’s digital preservation blog, “The Signal”:

Part 1: http://blogs.loc.gov/digitalpreservation/2016/02/blurred-lines-shapes-and-polygons-part-1-an-ndsr-ny-project-update/

Part 2: http://blogs.loc.gov/digitalpreservation/2016/02/blurred-lines-shapes-and-polygons-part-2-an-interview-with-frank-donnelly-geospatial-data-librarian/

Genevieve’s series of blog posts documenting her time at WCS continue here with a discussion of the complexities of preserving geospatial data and an interview with Frank Donnelly, the GIS Librarian at Baruch College (CUNY).

Check it out!

100 Years of Field Research at WCS

Theodore Roosevelt and his wife Edith were the first visitors to Kalacoon. Beebe is seated at the far end of the table, Mrs Roosevelt is seated nearest the camera and President Roosevelt is next to her. WCS Photo Collection

Why?  According to William Beebe, why was “the question which makes all science worthwhile.” Why, for instance, do tinamous of the genus Tinamus have rough skin on their lower legs while tinamous of the genus Crypturus have smooth skin?  Why do hoatzin populations seem to gather in nodes rather than being found throughout tropical forests?

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WCS Archives Awarded Grant to Protect Historical Photography

We are so pleased to announce that we have received a grant from the New York State Program for the Conservation and Preservation of Library Research Materials to rehouse photographic negatives dating back to the founding of the Bronx Zoo and the New York Aquarium.

The $16,674 grant will enable us to rehouse glass plate and film negatives that would otherwise be susceptible to damage and deterioration. The images, dating from the Bronx Zoo’s founding in 1899 through approximately 1930, will be cleaned and properly rehoused for long-term preservation. Although the entire collection requires rehousing, this project focuses on the first 12,000 negatives in the collection of more than 70,000.

Three-toed sloth at the Bronx Zoo around 1907. WCS Photo Collection

Three-toed sloth at the Bronx Zoo around 1907. WCS Photo Collection

For more on the grant and additional images from the collection, please see the WCS Newsroom, and we look forward to sharing news about the project as it progresses!