Author Archives: wcsarchivesadmin

Congo Gorilla Forest Twenty Year Anniversary [Instagram]

This week in 1999, the Congo Gorilla Forest opened at the Bronx Zoo. This illustration by Jack Unruh was on the invitation for the Opening Day ceremony. Since it opened, 7 million visitors have visited the exhibit, which allows zoo guests to donate their admission fees to WCS field conservation efforts in Central Africa. The exhibit has raised more than $10.6 million, which has gone directly to fund the conservation of Central Africa’s Congo Basin rainforest and wildlife. A happy 20 Year Anniversary to the exhibit! 

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Endangered Species Day 2019

For Endangered Species Day, we’re revisiting the story from 1905 when Bronx Zoo director William Hornaday formed the American Bison Society (ABS) to save the species from extinction. The Wildlife Conservation Society continues the fight to save wildlife and wild places.

Learn more about the work of the ABS in this Wild View post. For some information about bison at the Bronx Zoo today, look to this week’s Wild View post.

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124th Anniversary Blackout Poetry

To celebrate today’s 124th anniversary of WCS (founded as the New York Zoological Society), we held a blackout poetry contest using the first page of the Society’s First Annual Report during our staff Library & Archives Open House last week. Here are some selections of the poetry our creative staff came up with! 

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National Library Week 2019 [Instagram]

For National Library Week, we’re highlighting books in our library written and edited by WCS authors, both historical and present: William Bridges, William Hornaday, George Schaller, William Beebe, Amy Vedder and Bill Weber, Liz Bennett and John Robinson, and Ullas Karanth.

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The Alligator Chorus [Wild View]

Did you know that alligators sometimes bellow together to create their own little chorus? In a 1919 article from a WCS published magazine, there is a story about the Bronx Zoo alligators singing along to the whistles of ships returning to New York from World War I. Here we have the article as well as a photo of the largest alligator at the Zoo at the time. For more, read the blog post at Wild View.