Tag Archives: electronic records

Getting Data Out Of Its Floppy Cage

Our FC5025 controller connected to the TEAC FD-55GFR 5.25″ floppy disk drive.

The new year and holidays brought with it gifts and offerings for our legacy digital project!

Upon returning from our holiday break, we were greeted with the arrival of our TEAC FD-55GFR 5.25″ floppy disk drive along with Device Side Data’s FC5025 USB 5.25″ floppy controller.

We decided on purchasing a 5.25″ floppy disk drive of off Amazon and a FC5025 controller. The FC5025 controller is essentially a circuit board that liaises between your legacy 5.25″ floppy drive and a modern computer running a contemporary operating system. These two components are the essential building blocks to getting data off of 5.25″ floppy through disk imaging because they interface between an older, circa-1981 floppy disk drive and a modern computer. Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities’ (MITH) Vintage Computer site does an excellent job of breaking down the FC5025’s connections and instructions for imaging floppies. The card comes with drivers to enable connections to Windows (98, 7, 8, XP), Mac (OS X), and Linux operating systems.
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Turning on, Booting up and Jacking In

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Caroline Gil here, Digital Project Archivist for the Leon-Levy Foundation-funded Legacy Digital Media Project at the Wildlife Conservation Society. My initial weeks here at the WCS Archives have consisted of inventorying, assessing, and developing an all-encompassing, forensically sound plan for imaging and conserving approximately 1,000 pieces of digital media. For this pilot project, WCS Processing Archivist Leilani Dawson selected pieces of removable media, including optical, magnetic and spinning disk hard drives, which encompass about 393 3.5” floppy disks, 390 pieces of either CDs and DVDs (in all their configurations, i.e. CD-R, CD-RW, DVD-R, DVD +R etc), 46 Mini-DV video tapes, and half a dozen external hard drivesreally cool looking, heavy ones circa the early aughts. Continue reading

WCS Archives Awarded Grant from the Leon Levy Foundation

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We’re very excited to start work on a one-year project funded by the Leon Levy Foundation [LLF] to ingest and process our legacy digital removable media!  This project builds directly on the success of last year’s National Digital Stewardship Residency [NDSR] Project.  However, while that work focused on electronic records that are just now being transferred to the Archives, the LLF project will allow us to work with digital materials that had been previously transferred to the Archives as part of predominantly paper-based collections. Continue reading

WCS NDSR Project Post: “{Let’s Get Digital} Recap”

Our NDSR Resident, Genevieve Havemeyer-King, was recently one of the organizers of a free, all-day symposium on digital preservation held under the auspices of the Metropolitan New York Library Council, the Archivists Round Table of New York, and the Brooklyn Historical Society.

As an attendee, I can say that the event was a rousing success!  In her latest post on the NDSR-NY Resident blog, Genevieve showcases the day’s highlights and links to slides and other resources from the presentations and workshops:

http://ndsr.nycdigital.org/lets-get-digital-recap/

Check it out!

WCS NDSR Project Post: “Trojan Dots and DIY Solutions”

Our National Digital Stewardship Resident here at the WCS Archives,  Genevieve Havemeyer-King, has another post  on the NDSR-NY Program blog:

http://ndsr.nycdigital.org/trojan-dots-and-diy-solutions/

In this post Genevieve talks about her takeaways from a recent conference and describes one of the smallest challenges we’ve faced so far—so tiny, in fact, that we nearly didn’t see it!

Check it out!

WCS NDSR Project Post: “Blurred Lines, Shapes, and Polygons,” parts 1 and 2

Genevieve Havemeyer-King, the National Digital Stewardship Resident here at the WCS Archives,  has recently published a two-part post at the Library of Congress’s digital preservation blog, “The Signal”:

Part 1: http://blogs.loc.gov/digitalpreservation/2016/02/blurred-lines-shapes-and-polygons-part-1-an-ndsr-ny-project-update/

Part 2: http://blogs.loc.gov/digitalpreservation/2016/02/blurred-lines-shapes-and-polygons-part-2-an-interview-with-frank-donnelly-geospatial-data-librarian/

Genevieve’s series of blog posts documenting her time at WCS continue here with a discussion of the complexities of preserving geospatial data and an interview with Frank Donnelly, the GIS Librarian at Baruch College (CUNY).

Check it out!

WCS NDSR Project Post: “In With the Old: Selection, Appraisal & the Producer-Archive Interface”

Genevieve Havemeyer-King, the National Digital Stewardship Resident here at the WCS Archives,  has another post  on the NDSR-NY Program blog:

http://ndsr.nycdigital.org/in-with-the-old/

This time Genevieve describes some of the challenges of selecting born-digital materials and transferring them to the Archives for the NDSR pilot project.

Check it out!

WCS NDSR Project Post: “AMIA 2015”

Our National Digital Stewardship Resident, Genevieve Havemeyer-King, has another post  on the NDSR-NY Program blog:

http://ndsr.nycdigital.org/amia-2015-some-highlights-takeaways

This one focuses on her experience at the Association of Moving Image Archivists’ 2015 annual conference.  As Genevieve notes, of particular interest to WCS’s mission–and our NDSR project–“was Linda Tadic’s (Digital Bedrock) talk on the environmental impact of digital preservation.”

Check it out!

WCS NDSR Project Post: “The Digital Ecosystem at the Wildlife Conservation Society”

Graphical renderings of the “Ocean Wonders” exhibit and features at the NY Aquarium. Image courtesy of Naomi Pearson, EGAD at WCS.

Graphical renderings of the “Ocean Wonders” exhibit and features at the NY Aquarium. Image courtesy of Naomi Pearson, EGAD at WCS.

WCS’s National Digital Stewardship Resident, Genevieve Havemeyer-King, has written a post about our digital archives pilot project on the NDSR-NY Program blog:

http://ndsr.nycdigital.org/the-digital-ecosystem-at-the-wildlife-conservation-society/

In the post she “introduce[s] a few complex and exciting digital preservation challenges [she’s] encountered in each department” that she is surveying for the project.

Check it out!